Unique coup d’état. An attempt that went to bed

Unique coup d’état. An attempt that went to bed

On January 22 2017 a unique coup d’état occurred in Romania. 30,000 marched and then went to bed. The coup occurred only surrealistically, on a few media channels.

Preliminaries to uniqueness of coup

Romania is unique in many ways. Both good and bad. The good ones are related to the beauty and incredible richness of its nature and traditions. As to the bad ways, they have mainly to do with political affairs. Original democracy, for example, has become a common collocation in the Romanian language. Everyone uses and abuses it, yet for good reason.

Interestingly, many political terms have been turned upside down and acquired new, reversed meanings in the Romanian vernacular. But not only, since the very politicians, as well as journalists and political analysts have adopted such linguistic oddities. Due to exceptional originality, either innate or acquired, but mostly imposed by personal or group interests, this eclectic coterie keep enriching the political jargon with surreal connotations.

Elements of uniqueness

On January 22 2017 we witnessed their latest original contribution in the making. It was a live show shedding light on their politico-linguistic laboratory. This time subject to their distortion was none other than the coup d’état. Let us see what the elements of uniqueness were.

Occurrence only on surreal media channels

The coup d’état took place only on a few media channels. Rather surrealistically, I should say. That is why I will further refer to these as surreal. This is the first and most strange aspect of the coup’s uniqueness.

Contrary to what the people in the streets and viewers on other visual media could see, groups of journalists, analysts, and politicians on surreal media channels were living a coup d’état. Some were launching emergency calls, direct accuses and threats from television news studios. Others were writing surreal stuff on social media platforms. They all went propagandistically ballistic.

No coverage on national Television

Have you ever heard of a coup d’état with no coverage whatsoever on the national television? Well, the Romanian national television, TVR, acted as though nothing was happening. This would be the secondly important aspect of the coup’s uniqueness. And that is why I never watch their news programs. In the heat of the events it was one of my friends who wrote on Facebook that there was peace and quiet on TVR. However, I heard they broadcast the news about the people’s manifestations late at night. I cannot possibly tell if it was in a realistic or surrealistic manner.

A peaceful march

Common people marched in Bucharest, the capital city, but also in other Romanian cities, to protest against the government. It was clearly a peaceful manifestation. Although members of some opposition parties joined in the march, the great majority were common people. You could see whole families with kids walking along the main boulevards, people of all ages and social extractions.

What brought them together was the communist government’s covert attempt to pass two emergency bills referring to amnesty and pardon. It was President Klaus Iohannis who disclosed this secret intention earlier in the week, which was hailed by all believers in democracy.

In short, the so-called coup was a manifestation for democracy and transparency. There was no violence involved, there were no weapons, not even the least intention of using verbal abuse or physical force. Cohorts of people simply walked the streets either in silence or chanting legitimate slogans. There was no trace of the verbal violence I had just observed during the women’s march in the U.S. And are the States not the world’s model of democracy?

No state forces involved

Which armed or unarmed forces organized and participated in the coup d’état? Which section of the state apparatus? There was no such thing and no such action.

True, President Iohannis made a short appearance in the middle of the crowd to reiterate his belief in true, not original democracy. And reinforce his conviction that justice should belong to all, not only to a powerful few. He took a crowd bath and left.

Maybe he should have restrained himself from hailing the demonstrators, known the communists’ ideological ardor to grab all the state’s powers. Knowing how the great communist victors of the recent elections have been continuously laying the scheme for the President’s suspension. How they have been waiting in ambush for his every faux pas.

Marchers went peacefully to bed

After they finished their march, the protesters retreated as peacefully to their homes and went to bed. They may not have had a peaceful sleep, but sleep it was.

The coup d’état continued though on two television channels. ‘Professional’ ‘journalists’ enrolled there went so far as to fabricate the coup’s climax and the terrible aftermath. No premier, no government, no parliament, no free press, and no freed political convicts. Only chaos. Themselves chased to death, there would be no one left to fight for the great victors’ cause and lives. And no one to broadcast live such bloody surreal tableaux. Until late into the night they came up with vivid scenes of civil war so atrocious as to shake earth and skies.

An attempt to shake dreams

But that was not all. From these television platforms enraged news-people called for immediate action. They now commanded, then entreated citizens from all over the country to flock to Bucharest in numbers by far greater than the 30, 000 by now sleeping demonstrators. Come here to fight, they would shout their lungs out, come here and show them who’s got the power.

And this was how they attempted to sow the seeds of another ‘mineriada’. A true ‘PSD-riada’ of the 21st century.

Hopefully, most people won’t have these hateful villains shake their dreams of real democracy in Romania.

About the author

Viviana

Next Woman blogger. Keep young, fit, confident, magnetic. Be happy - be yourself.